June 23, 2010

Betraying the “Son of Hamas”

Faith McDonnell
June 23, 2010

On June 30, 2010, a deportation trial is set at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Immigration Court in San Diego, CA. The defendant has been deemed a threat to national security. He had previously been denied asylum in the United States because, says the Department of Homeland Security, there is reasonable evidence that he was engaged in terrorist activity.

Sounds good so far, but where did the evidence come from about this defendant, Mosab Hassan Yousef? From his book, Son of Hamas: A Gripping Account of Terror, Betrayal, Political Intrigue, and Unthinkable Choices. That’s right, the Department of Homeland Security plans to deport a man who left Islam and terrorist connections behind, became a Christian, and risked his life as a counter-spy for the Israelis. They plan to deport a man who foiled terrorist attacks and suicide bombings, saving Israeli, American, and Palestinian lives, and who, in turn, is very likely a dead man if he is deported to the Middle East.

 

 

If you have not read Yousef’s book, you may have seen stories about him or interviews with him on television or the print media or the internet. He definitely made headlines, even with the most cynical of media sources, when it was revealed that the oldest son of the co-founder of Hamas, Sheikh Hassan Yousef, had converted to Christianity. Yousef became a Christian after a British cabdriver in Jerusalem gave him an English-Arabic copy of the New Testament and invited him to a Bible Study. “I found that I was really drawn to the grace, love and humility that Jesus talked about,” says Yousef in “Son of Hamas.”

More shockwaves came when Yousef told of how he had worked as a double agent for the government of Israel’s internal security agency, Shin Bet. But as exciting as is his story, most of the media, and the United States government did not want to hear Yousef’s summation that Muslims “live sincerely and ignorantly in the pitch darkness of Islam,” or that “The god of the Qur’an is not tolerant, understanding or forgiving. He hates furiously and punishes without mercy everyone who crosses his red lines.” Not exactly politically correct!

Under a provision of U.S. immigration law, anyone who is shown to have provided “material support” for terrorist organizations is automatically denied asylum. It’s a good law, but it has to be implemented with common sense! Yousef appeared to be providing “material support” for Hamas, but only as part of his cover, in order to then provide intelligence to Israel to counter and defeat that terrorism. But this does not faze the San Diego Department of Homeland Security’s senior attorney Kerri Calcador. She has indicated that if on June 30 the Immigration Judge rules in Yousef’s favor, DHS will appeal the ruling.

 

A small coalition of conservative bloggers, which includes Maggie’s Notebook, The Lonely Conservative, and The Camp of the Saints, have put together a website to Save Mosab Yousef. They include ideas about contacting members of Congress and the media, and sending letters protesting the deportation order to the Department of Homeland Security. I urge you to make use of this helpful site, and to do what you can to help save Yousef.

Something is terribly wrong when former Taliban terrorist Sayed Rahmatullah Hashemi, who defended the egregious actions of the Taliban against women, is permitted to attend Yale and terrorist-connected, Shari’a espousing Tariq Ramadan, whose grandfather, Hassan al Banna, founded the Muslim Brotherhood, is welcomed into the United States by the U.S. Secretary of State, but we are set to deport a pro-democracy and freedom, great source of intelligence about Islam, ex-Muslim. As the title of Londonistan author Melanie Phillips’ great new book declares, the world is turned upside down!

We are in a fight for the survival of civilization. Yousef is one of our allies, an ally to Israel, and a great source of help in understanding what we face. Why are we treating him like the enemy?

 

 


 

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